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  3. Army Ranger Handbook https://t.co/6zAY0lSCoq #ThriveThrough

  4. Josiah Wallingford

    Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments

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    The first line of medical defense in wartime is the combat medic. Although in ancient times medics carried the caduceus into battle to signify the neutral, humanitarian nature of their tasks, they have never been immune to the perils of war. They have made the highest sacrifices to save the lives of others, and their dedication to the wounded soldier is the foundation of military medical care. Earth’s environments have always influenced the planning and conduct of military operations. Past campaigns have been impacted by heat, cold, and altititude, as well as the changes in barometric pressure that divers face in special operations. During the 20th century alone, US armed forces have been involved in terrestrial military operations in hot climates in the North African campaign and Pacific theater operations during World War II, the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars, and military and humanitarian operations in Panama, Haiti, Grenada, Rwanda, and Somalia. Our major military operations involving cold climates during the past century include World War I and World War II, the Korean War, and most recently in Bosnia and Kosovo. Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, Volume 1, treats the major problems caused by fighting in heat and cold. The topics of Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, Volume 2, are the effects of altitude, especially as experienced in mountain terrain and by aviators, and the complex interactions between humans and the special environments created by the machines used in warfare. Our warfighters were exposed to mountain terrain during World War II, the Korean War, in military and humanitarian efforts in South America, and most recently in the Balkans. Military action has also occurred in some of the environments considered “special” (eg, on and below the water’s surface) in every war that this country has fought, whereas other special environments (eg, air—flights not only within Earth’s atmosphere but also beyond it, in space) have become settings for the havoc of war only as a result of 20th-century technology. The second volume also contains a discussion of the personal environment within the protective uniforms worn by service members against the fearsome hazards of chemical and biological warfare. This microenvironment—created by the very encapsulation that protects the wearer—is in some ways different from but in others similar to all closely confined, man-made environments (eg, the stresses that divers face in coping with the changes in barometric pressure). Whatever the environment, this point needs to be kept in mind: indifference to environmental conditions can contribute as much to defeat as the tactics of the enemy. Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, Volume 3, emphasizes the need for a preventive approach to decrease attrition due to harsh environments, such as predicting the likelihood of its occurrence and stimulating awareness of how specific factors (eg, gender, nutritional status) are sometimes important determinants of outcome. The third volume concludes with reproductions of two of the classics of environmental medicine: the lectures given by the late Colonel Tom Whayne on heat and cold injury, respectively, at the Army Medical School in 1951; for decades these have been unavailable except as mimeographed handouts to students attending specialized courses. Military and civilian experts from the United States and other countries have participated as authors of chapters in this three-volume textbook, Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments. The textbook provides historical information, proper prevention and clinical treatment of the various environmental illnesses and injuries, and the performance consequences our warfighters face when exposed to environmental extremes of heat, cold, altitude, pressure, and acceleration. The contents are unique in that they present information on the physiology, physical derangements, psychology, and the consequent effects on military operations together in all these harsh environments. This information should be a valuable reference not only for the physicians and other healthcare providers who prepare our warfighters to fight in these environments but also for those who care for the casualties. Military medical personnel must never forget that harsh environments are great, silent, debilitating agents for military operations. On 1 July 1941, as part of Hitler’s attack of the Soviet Union, the XXXVI Corps of the German army crossed the Finnish–Soviet border and began what was planned as a rapid advance some 50 miles to the east, where lay the strategically important railroad that linked the Arctic Ocean port of Murmansk with the Russian hinterland to the south. The German soldiers in their heavy woolen uniforms were greeted not only by determined Soviet resistance, but also by an unexpected enemy: the day was hot, with temperatures in the high 80s (°F), and there were swarms of ferocious mosquitoes. During the next 3 weeks the temperature rose above 85°F on 12 days and twice reached 97°F, and it was soon obvious that military operations were possible only in the relative cool of the “night.” By the end of July, after advancing only 13 miles, the attack was called off, with the XXXVI Corps being denounced as “degenerate” by the German high command. Higher commanders obviously never considered that low combat effectiveness might result from the hazardous environmental factors: the heat, insects, and 24 hours of constant light. After all, who would have thought that heat stress might impair combat operations occurring 30 miles north of the Arctic Circle.1 The German experience in northern Finland was anything but unique; military history is full of examples where weather conditions influenced the outcome of military campaigns. In fact, the earliest recorded instance of weather’s having a direct effect on the outcome of a battle dates back to the Old Testament: And it came to pass, as they fled from before Israel, and were in the going down to Beth-horon, that the Lord cast down great stones from heaven upon them unto Azekah, and they died: they were more which died with hailstones than they whom the children of Israel slew with the sword.2 The mission of the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachu- setts, is both to understand how soldiers react to military environmental and occupational stresses and to devise materiel and doctrinal solutions that are protective and therapeutic. The publication of the three volumes of Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments will ensure that both healthcare providers and military line commanders do not repeat the mistakes of countless commanders of the past who have underestimated the threats that harsh environments pose to their soldiers. I strongly recommend that all commanders and healthcare personnel become acquainted with the volumes of the Textbooks of Military Medicine dealing with harsh environments to better protect and preserve our sons and daughters during their deployments around the world. The volumes of Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments became a reality because of the dedication and hard work of Kent B. Pandolf, PhD, and Robert E. Burr, MD, then a Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, US Army, the specialty editors of this three-volume textbook. Dr. Burr was primus inter pares in the group that performed the critically important tasks of deciding on the subject matter and finding appropriate authors; when Dr. Burr left the Army, Dr. Pandolf brought the project to fruition. This first volume, which deals with hot and cold environments, owes its completion to the willingness of its section editors—C. Bruce Wenger, MD, PhD, and Robert S. Pozos, PhD—well-known experts in the fields of heat and cold stress, respectively, to perform the seemingly endless tasks necessary to assure the scientific accuracy of the text. In addition, the specialty and section editors wish to thank Rebecca Pincus for her invaluable help during this book’s formation. The forthcoming second and third volumes deal with mountains and special operations environments, and sustaining health and performance during military operations. It is not too much to hope that the labors of the volumes’ editors and many authors will lighten the burdens of our military personnel in the years to come. The current medical system to support the U.S. Army at war is a continuum from the forward line of troops through the continental United States; it serves as a primary source of trained replacements during the early stages of a major conflict. The system is designed to optimize the return to duty of the maximum number of trained combat soldiers at the lowest possible level. Far-forward stabilization helps to maintain the physiology of injured soldiers who are unlikely to return to duty and allows for their rapid evacuation from the battlefield without needless sacrifice of life or function.

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  5. Josiah Wallingford

    Physical Fitness Training - FM-21-20

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    On 5 July 1950, U.S. troops, who were unprepared for the physical demands of war, were sent to battle. The early days of the Korean war were nothing short of disastrous, as U.S. soldiers were routed by a poorly equipped, but well-trained, North Korean People’s Army. As American soldiers withdrew, they left behind wounded comrades and valuable equipment their training had not adequately prepared them to carry heavy loads. The costly lessons learned by Task Force Smith in Korea are as important today as ever. If we fail to prepare our soldiers for their physically demanding wartime tasks, we are guilty of paying lip service to the principle of “Train as you fight.” Our physical training programs must do more for our soldiers than just get them ready for the semiannual Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT’). FM 21 -20 is directed at leaders who plan and conduct physical fitness training. It provides guidelines for developing programs which will improve and maintain physical fitness levels for all Army personnel. These programs will help leaders prepare their soldiers to meet the physical demands of war. This manual can also be used as a source book by all soldiers. FM 21-20 was written to conform to the principles outlined in FM 25-100, Training the Force. The benefits to be derived from a good physical fitness program are many. It can reduce the number of soldiers on profile and sick call, invigorate training, and enhance productivity and mental alertness. A good physical fitness program also promotes team cohesion and combat survivability. It will improve soldiers’ combat readiness. The proponent of this publication is HQ TRADOC. Send comments and recommendations on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to Headquarters, US Army Infantry Center, US Army Physical Fitness School (ATZB-PF), Fort Benning, GA31905-5000.

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  6. Josiah Wallingford

    Mountain Operations FM-3-97.6

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    FM 3-97.6 describes the tactics, techniques, and procedures that the United States (US) Army uses to fight in mountainous regions. It is directly linked to doctrinal principles found in FM 3-0 and FM 3-100.40 and should be used in conjunction with them. It provides key information and considerations for commanders and staffs regarding how mountains affect personnel, equipment, and operations. It also assists them in planning, preparing, and executing operations, battles, and engagements in a mountainous environment. Army units do not routinely train for operations in a mountainous environment. Therefore, commanders and trainers at all levels should use this manual in conjunction with TC 90-6-1, Army Training and Evaluation Program (ARTEP) mission training plans, and the training principles in FM 7-0 and FM 7-10 when preparing to conduct operations in mountainous terrain. The proponent of this publication is Headquarters TRADOC. Send comments and recommendations on DA Form 2028 directly to Commander, US Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, ATTN: ATZL-SWW, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 66027-6900.

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  7. Josiah Wallingford

    Battlefield Weather Effects - FM-34-81-1

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    This manual provides some of the more common critical weather (and environmental) effects data and applies that information to specific operations, systems, and personnel. Inclement weather degrades battlefield operations, affects weapons and other systems, and plays a major role in the effectiveness of troops in the field. This data is intended to support the brigade and battalion S2 and staff. It is applicable to combat, combat service, and combat service support units and is intended for use by Active Component (AC), Reserve Components (RC), and Army National Guard (ARNG) units in both training and combat situations.

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  8. Josiah Wallingford

    Northern Operations - FM-31-71

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    1-1. Purpose and Scope This manual provides doctrinal guidance to commanders and staffs for operation and administration of combat, combat support, and combat service support units in the northern regions of the world. The material contained in this manual is directed primarily toward operations below division level. Operations at division level and above will be essentially the same as those in other areas of the world. It is the forward elements of divisions or task forces that must overcome the many summer and winter problems inherent in northern operations. Commanders and staff officers at all levels must understand and appreciate the effects of the northern environment on the operations of these foward units and carefully consider them when planning each operation. The reader should refer to FM 31-70 and FM 31-72 and to other manuals of the arms and services for further information concerning northern operations (app A). The contents of this manual are applicable to-- General war, to include a consideration of the employment and protection from nuclear munitions and chemical, biological, and radiological agents; and operations in nuclear, chemical, or biological environments. Limited war. Cold war, to include stability operations assistance in internal defense and internal development operations. The provisions of Standardization of Operations and Logistics (SOLOG) Agreement 23R, Arctic Doctrine are implemented in this manual. Users of this manual are encouraged to submit recommendations to improve its clarity or accuracy. Reasons should be provided for each comment to insure understanding and complete evaluation. Comments should be prepared on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications) and forwarded direct to the Commanding General, United States Army, Alaska, APO Seattle 98749. Originators of proposed changes which would constitute a significant modification of approved Army doctrine may send an information copy, through command channels, to the Commanding General, United States Army Combat Developments Command, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060, to facilitate review and followup.

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  9. Josiah Wallingford

    Camouflage-Concealment-and-Decoys - FM-20-3

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    This field manual (FM) is intended to help company-level leaders understand the principles and techniques of camouflage, concealment, and decoys (CCD). To remain viable, all units must apply CCD to personnel and equipment. Ignoring a threat's ability to detect friendly operations on the battlefield is shortsighted and dangerous. Friendly units enhance their survivability capabilities if they are well versed in CCD principles and techniques. CCD is equal in importance to marksmanship, maneuver, and mission. It is an integral part of a soldier's duty. CCD encompasses individual and unit efforts such as movement, light, and noise discipline; litter control; dispersal; and deception operations. Each soldier's actions must contribute to the unit's overall CCD posture to maximize effectiveness. Increased survivability is the goal of a CCD plan. A unit commander must encourage each soldier to think of survivability and CCD as synonymous terms. Training soldiers to recognize this correlation instills a greater appreciation of CCD values. A metric conversion chart is provided in Appendix A. The proponent of this publication is HQ TRADOC. Send comments and recommendations on Department of the Army (DA) Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to Commandant, United States Army Engineer School (USAES), ATTN: ATSE- DOT-DD, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri 65473-6650. This publication implements Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 2931, Orders for the Camouflage of the Red Cross and Red Crescent on Land in Tactical Operations.

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  10. Josiah Wallingford

    Basic Cold Weather Manual - FM-31-70

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    1-1. Purpose and Scope a. This manual is designed to prepare the individual soldier and small unit commander to conduct military operations for extended periods of time under the most severe and varying cold weather climatic conditions. The doctrine and techniques in the manual are applicable in any area that has cold weather and snow with their accompanying operational problems. Troops properly trained in this doctrine and these techniques will be able to fight; live; and move in any cold weather area of the world. b. The provisions of SOLOG Agreement 23R, Arctic Doctrine are implemented in this manual. c. The material contained herein emphasizes that cold, with its attendant problems affects military operations but does not prevent them. The proper use of authorized equipment and field expedients will, to a major degree, overcome any problems encountered as a result of the cold. It is the commander’s responsibility to train his men so they can make the environment save military operations, not hinder them. The material presented herein is applicable, without modification to nuclear and nonnuclear warfare, employment of, and protection from, chemical, biological, and radiological agents, and internal defense and development operations. d. Throughout this manual reference is made to the additional time required to conduct various tasks in cold weather operations. This requirement cannot be overemphasized and must be included in all planning. In addition to the increased amount of time consumed in actual movement, allowance must be made for other time-consuming tasks that are not present in temperate zone operations. These include, among others, erecting and striking tents, performing maintenance, constructing roads, starting and warming engines, movement of supplies, and hundreds of other small tasks that must be performed while wearing bulky cold weather clothing. e. Insofar as possible illustrations used in this manual reflect Standard A items of clothing and equipment. However, because of non- availability of some items at time of publication, some illustrations show Standard B or C items of clothing (para 2-7). f. Measurements in this manual to the extent practicable, reflect both the Metric and U.S. systems; however, in some cases figures will show only the U.S. system. For ease in transposition, meters have been converted to yards on a one for one basis. For more exact measurements use the conversions shown in appendix H. g. Users of this manual are encouraged to submit recommendations to improve its clarity or accuracy, Comments should be keyed to the specific page, paragraph, and line of the text in which the change is recommended. Reasons should be provided for each comment to insure understanding and complete evaluation. Comments should be forwarded direct to Commanding General, United States Army, Alaska, Originators of proposed changes which would constitute a significant modification of approved Army doctrine may send an information copy, through command channels, to the Commanding General, United States Army Combat Developments Command. This manual is prepared with the assumption that normal individual and basic unit training have been completed. The manual should be used in conjunction with the basic field manuals of the arms and services as well as FM 31-71and FM 3l-72. Appropriate technical manuals contain detailed information beyond the treatment given in this manual on the operation and maintenance of equipment during cold weather operations. Appendix A contains a list of supplementary manuals and references.

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  11. Josiah Wallingford

    Topographic Operations - FM-3-34.230

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    This field manual (FM) describes doctrine for topographic operations in support of the United States (US) Army’s strategic, operational, and tactical missions. The Army’s strategic challenge is to prepare for the rise of a major military competitor who is both competent and capable. All topographic operations must rise to the challenges of providing topographic information to a battle commander so that the battle space can be visualized in time, space, and distance. This requires absolute fidelity and definition of the battle space for decision making and mission execution. Appendix A contains an English-to-metric measurement conversion chart. The proponent of this publication is HQ TRADOC. Send comments and recommendations on Department of the Army (DA) Form 2028 directly to Commandant, US Army Engineer School (USAES), ATTN: ATSE-DOT-DD, Directorate of Training, 320 Engineer Loop, Suite 336, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri 65473-8929. Unless this publication states otherwise, masculine nouns and pronouns do not refer exclusively to men.

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  12. Josiah Wallingford

    Combat Health Logistics FM-4-02.1

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    Combat health logistics (CHL), to include blood management, is one of the major Army Medical Department (AMEDD) functional areas. Under the Medical Force 2000 (MF2K) concept, CHL in a theater of operations (TO) is provided by the medical battalion, logistics (forward), the medical battalion, logistics (rear), the theater medical materiel management center, and the medical detachment (logistics support). These organizations were designed based upon the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) scenario and workloads. Current MF2K CHL doctrine is articulated in Field Manual (FM) 8-10-9. Under Force XXI and the medical reengineering initiative (MRI), theater CHL will be provided by five new tables of organization and equipment (TOEs) organizations and a table of distribution and allowances (TDA) element from the United States (US) Army Medical Materiel Agency (USAMMA) (see Chapter 3). These new TOEs organizations were designed based on lessons learned from Desert Shield/ Desert Storm and recent contingency operations. The purpose of this publication is to describe the CHL in support of a Force Projection Army into the 21st Century. It embodies doctrine based on the MRI and the A-edition TOE. The organizational structures presented in this publication reflect those established in the A-edition TOE in effect on the date of this publication. For a copy of your modified TOE, contact the Authorizations Documentation Directorate, 9900 Belvoir Road, Suite 120, ATTN: MOFI-FMA, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-2287.

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  13. Josiah Wallingford

    Preventive Medicine Services - FM-4-02.17

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    This field manual (FM) provides information on the mission, organization, and responsibilities for preventive medicine (PVNTMED) support operations throughout the operational continuum. It is directed toward the commanders at all levels of deployment, their staffs, the command surgeons, the PVNTMED planning staffs at the Army, joint, combined, allied, and coalition staff levels, and to the individual soldier and unit leaders on their role in the application of preventive medicine measures (PMM). It further defines each staff element of PVNTMED and lists the functions, capabilities, and management requirements associated with each. It provides procedures for directing, controlling, and managing PVNTMED assets within the area of operations (AO). This publication outlines the functions and operations of each PVNTMED section and how it integrates its activities in support of those operations.

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  14. Josiah Wallingford

    Terrain Analysis - FM-5-33

    Version 1.0.0

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    SCOPE Terrain analysis, an integral part of the intelligence preparation of the battlefield (IPB),playsakeyroleinanymilitaryoperation. Duringpeacetime,terrainanalysts build extensive data bases for each potential area of operations. They provide a base for all intelligence operations, tactical decisions, and tactical operations. They also sup- port the planning and execution of most other battlefield functions. Because terrain features continually undergo change on the earth’s surface, data bases must be continuously revised and updated. PURPOSE This field manual prescribes basic doctrine and is intended to serve as a primary source of the most current available information on terrain analysis procedures for all personnel who plan, supervise, and conduct terrain analysis. The manual discusses the impact of the terrain and the weather on operations. USER INFORMATION The proponent of this publication is the US Army Engineer School. Submit changes for improving the publication on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) to Commandant, Directorate of Training and Doctrine, US Army En- gineer School, ATTN: ATSE-TDM-P, Ft. Leonard Wood, MO 65473-6500.

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  15. Josiah Wallingford

    Survivability - FM-5-103

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    The purpose of this manual is to integrate survivability into the over- all AirLand battle structure. Survivability doctrine addresses when, where, and how fighting and protective battlefield positions are prepared for individual soldiers, troop units, vehicles, weapons, and equipment. This manual implements survivability tactics for all branches of the combined arms team. Battlefield survival critically depends on the quality of protection afforded by the positions. The full spectrum of survivability encompasses planning and locating position sites, designing adequate overhead cover, analyzing terrain conditions and construction materials, selecting excavation methods, and countering the effects of direct and indirect fire weapons. This manual is intended for engineer commanders, noncommissioned officers, and staff officers who support and advise the combined arms team, as well as combat arms commanders and staff officers who establish priorities, allocate resources, and integrate combat engineer support. The proponent of this publication is the US Army Engineer School. Submit changes for improving this publication on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) and forward it directly to Commandant, US Army Engineer School, A TTN: A TZA-TD-P , Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5291.

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  16. Josiah Wallingford

    Combat Stress - FM-6-22.5

    Version 1.0.0

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    1. PURPOSE Marine Corps Reference Publication (MCRP) 6-11C, Combat Stress; Navy Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (NTTP) 1-15M, Commander’s Handbook on Combat Stress; and Army Field Manual (FM) 6-22.5, Combat Stress, provide the tactics, techniques, and procedures required for small-unit leaders to effectively prevent, identify, and manage combat stress when it occurs in their units/commands. 2. SCOPE This publication contains essential information about combat and combat-related stress. It describes, in layman’s terms, techniques to prevent, identify, and treat harmful combat stress reactions at the lowest level or until professional medical assistance is available. It provides a basic understanding of the causes of stress and describes the preventive actions that can be taken to avoid or reduce its harmful effects. It describes how to identify and manage combat stress symptoms when they appear, and provides techniques to prepare units to handle combat stress reactions when they occur. All small-unit leaders should read this publication. Unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine gender is used, both men and women are included.

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  17. Version 1.0.0

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    This field manual (FM) establishes the combat health support (CHS) doctrine and provides the principles for providing CHS in stability operations and support operations. It is designed for use by personnel involved in CHS planning for stability operations and support operations and command surgeons (at all levels of command) and their staffs. The proponent of this publication is the United States (US) Army Medical Department Center and School (AMEDDC&S). Send comments and recommendations on Department of the Army (DA) Form 2028 directly to the Commander, AMEDDC&S, ATTN: MCCS-FCD-L, 1400 East Grayson Street, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234-6175.

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  18. Version 1.0.0

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    Marine Corp Individual's Guide to Understanding and Survivng Terrorism - mcrp302e

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  19. ProtectorCdn

    club picture troubles

    Oh cool! Couldn't see it to crop it
  20. Josiah Wallingford

    club picture troubles

    I am seeing this picture you have just uploaded of a barn.
  21. I liked this one because the guy actually has a MAG and speaks from experience. For sure I'm one of the guys that pushes hard for a MAG. Probably because I've got a lot going and I'd rather have 500 perennials for five families than the 100 or so we have now. If your in central Canada and don't mind travelling once in a while check out my looking for a MAG post
  22. Pictures don't seem to be uploading anymore. First with my club picture and now here.
  23. https://permies.com/t/85907 I really liked this thread on someone wanting to be self sufficient and life always seems to get in her way. Many pointed out that true self sufficiency can only come from community. What they mean to me is were humans and humans have flaws and weaknesses. When I tore out the tendon in my arm I was moving a trailer. If I had community I would have had a hand and it never would have happened end. I spent the summer filling garden beds by hand when a friend with a tractor and 3 days would have saved me a lot of trouble. Communities plant 1000 strawberries and people plant 100. Makes me think more than ever community is the way forward.
  24. MCDP-1-Warfighting.pdf View File MCDP-1-Warfighting.pdf Submitter Josiah Wallingford Submitted 06/22/2018 Category Guides  
  25. Josiah Wallingford

    MCDP-1-Warfighting.pdf

    Version 1.0.0

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    MCDP-1-Warfighting.pdf

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  26. MCRP-3-0B-How-to-Conduct-Training.pdf View File MCRP-3-0B-How-to-Conduct-Training.pdf Submitter Josiah Wallingford Submitted 06/22/2018 Category Guides  
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    • STANDING RANGERS ORDERS, MAJOR ROBERT ROGERS, 1759
      1. Don't forget nothing.
      2. Have your musket clean as a whistle, hatchet scoured, sixty rounds powder and ball, and be ready to march at a minute's warning.
      3. When you're on the march, act the way you would if you was sneaking up on a deer. See the enemy first.
      4. Tell the truth about what you see and what you do. There is an army depending on us for correct information. You can lie all you please when you tell other folks about the Rangers, but don't never lie to a Ranger or officer.
      5. Don't never take a chance you don't have to.
      6. When we're on the march we march single file, far enough apart so one shot can't go through two men.
      7. If we strike swamps, or soft ground, we spread out abreast, so it's hard to track us.
      8. When we march, we keep moving till dark, so as to give the enemy the least possible chance at us.
      9. When we camp, half the party stays awake while the other half sleeps.
      10. If we take prisoners, we keep' em separate till we have had time to examine them, so they can't cook up a story between' em.
      11. Don't ever march home the same way. Take a different route so you won't be ambushed.
      12. No matter whether we travel in big parties or little ones, each party has to keep a scout 20 yards ahead, 20 yards on each flank, and 20 yards in the rear so the main body can't be surprised and wiped out.
      13. Every night you'll be told where to meet if surrounded by a superior force.
      14. Don't sit down to eat without posting sentries.
      15. Don't sleep beyond dawn. Dawn's when the French and Indians attack.
      16. Don't cross a river by a regular ford.
      17. If somebody's trailing you, make a circle, come back onto your own tracks, and ambush the folks that aim to ambush you.
      18. Don't stand up when the enemy's coming against you. Kneel down, lie down, hide behind a tree.
      19. Let the enemy come till he's almost close enough to touch, then let him have it and jump out and finish him up with your hatchet.
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    • That's my great grandfather's barn. Must be over 50yrs old and straight as when it was first built. He helped enough others and built enough community to get this feat done. His kids and even great-grandchildren see this barn and know anything is possible. If he could build this with horses. There are no excuses for any of us.

      That is one of the stories I'm going to outline below. I'm going...
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    • How to use Member Maps including adding yourself to the map and choosing which category you would like to drop a marker down on.
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    • Added a "Members" tab. Choose Members in the navigatin bar. This will display all of our members and allows you to view their content, follow them, message them, etc etc.

      We have released three newsletter options. By default you are subscribed to the Weekly newsletter but you can change your subscription to Daily or Monthly as well or none at all. You can also choose to receive the newsletter in HTML or Plain Text formats.

      You will find your newsletter subscriptions in your account settings.
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    • This is a great tool eliminating the need for a rotor tiller. I can see a future where every household has one next to the hoe.
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