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What Kind of Pan is Best for Backpacking?

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Curt Linville

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180 Stove
 
All pan materials will work well with the 180 Stove.  Some are better for backpacking than others.  That said, here is a rundown of a little of our research.
 
Cast iron – too heavy for backpacking, but perhaps the best material for cooking.  It spreads the heat evenly, minimizes scorching, and some believe the healthiest material to eat from.  If pan metal “leaches” into the food, it is iron – a vitamin.
 
Aluminum – light and common as a backpacking pan.  There are lots of “unproven”  health concerns about eating from aluminum cookware especially when cooking acidic food like tomatoes, lemons, etc.  For simply boiling water, this is a minor concern.  But, this is one of the reasons our stoves are not made of aluminum.   Once the aluminum has been anodized, then this concern is mitigated significantly as long as the hard anodized layer is not scratched.  I do cook with anodized aluminum from time to time.
 
Anodized Aluminum with 180 Stove
 
 
Stainless steel – thin stainless steel is great for backpacking; strong and light.  While it is possible for trace amounts of chromium to get into the food, this is minimal and not a real health concern.  This is my favorite backpacking cooking material.  It will scorch food more than some materials, however, but this is common for most thin backpacking pans.
 
Titanium is known to be one of the best materials to cook with as it is highly unreactive and does not leach metals into the food.
 
Pans with a larger diameter base heat water more quickly, as a rule, but they can take up space in the pack.  They have the added advantage of working better for cooking eggs and the like.  Our stoves are sturdy and have no issues cooking even with large, cast iron Dutch ovens.  Other backpacking stoves cannot do this.  They are simply too small and flimsy.
 
Can your backpacking stove do this?
 
 
Make sure whatever you use comes with a good lid.  It speeds up boiling time and doubles for a plate or bowl. 
 
One thing to keep in mind is that some natural fuels will coat the outside of the pan with creosote.  This is because the pan has cooler water or foods inside that allows the creosote to condense onto the paPackable Grilln.  This creosote causes no harm, and does not even stain the pack once it is cool.  It can be “cooked off” by heating an empty pan, but I usually don’t bother as it causes no issues.  However, I would not use my wife’s favorite pans when burning pine, especially….  Some people coat the outside of the pan with a little soap before cooking as it reduces the “smoking” of the pan.  Again, I don’t bother as the creosote is a non-issue to me.
 
And don't forget, the 180 Stove works well without a pan too as a packable grill.

 

180 Flame

 

 Have fun!  Get out there!

 

 

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